Snowy Monday in Warsaw: Miniatures Park

It’s February in Warsaw. It’s cold. It’s gray. It’s snowing (again). Fortunately, there was yet another odd little museum to visit with the lovely ladies of the International Women’s Group of WarsawParku Miniatur Województwa Mazowieckiego.

No, I can’t pronounce it, either. “Masovian District Miniature Park,” is the proper translation. In fact, there is no park, although one is planned in the future to house around 50 of the 1/25 scale miniature buildings. Each is a perfect model commemorating a historic structure that once existed in Warsaw.

At the moment, a collection of the first ten completed reproductions is housed in a nice Art Deco mansion, one of the very few Warsaw buildings that was not completely leveled in World War II.

While miniatures are not really my thing, I couldn’t help but be impressed by the care and detail that went into each one of these buildings. When the outdoor park is finally completed, it will be a pretty cool Warsaw attraction.

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The bank building was preserved because it was a German hospital during the war.
Not Vienna, but pretty nice.
Not Vienna, but pretty nice.
A model of a building that once stood in the Saxon Garden.
A model of the Grand Lounge that once stood in the Saxon Garden.
Tiny dancers on the roof of the building.
Tiny courtiers on the roof of the building.
A commercial building that is labeled in both Polish and Russian.
A commercial building that is labeled in both Polish and Russian.
Another large palace.
Another large palace.
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An even bigger palace. This 19th century building had shops on the bottom level, offices and apartments up above.
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The entrance of the building.
Loved this little horse and carriage.
Loved this little horse and carriage.
A wooden theater that was used to store ammunition during the war. Kaboom.
A wooden theater that was used to store ammunition during the war. Kaboom.
A large marketplace from the Soviet era.
A large marketplace from the Soviet era.
Finally, the Saxon Palace. All that remains are a few of the arches from the middle, which now house the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.
Finally, the Saxon Palace. This was blown to bits by the Germans in 1944. All that remains are a few of the arches from the middle, which now house the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.
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